Our Stories

2 hours ago

ADELAIDE BIPLANES

Meet Charlie Brown ....

We are getting ready to introduce Charlie Brown to you, avery big Jack Russell, a real Charlie character and Snoopy's young apprentice ....

Charlie is learning the ropes and will star in a short film this coming Saturday, fingers crossed for Charlie !! Eeeee, that will be fun trying to make that happen!!

Here he is waiting to go biplane flying!
... See MoreSee Less

Meet Charlie Brown ....

We are getting ready to introduce Charlie Brown to you, avery big Jack Russell, a real Charlie character and Snoopys young apprentice ....

Charlie is learning the ropes and will star in a short film this coming Saturday, fingers crossed for Charlie !! Eeeee, that will be fun trying to make that happen!!

Here he is waiting to go biplane flying!

 

Comment on Facebook

Hi Charlie Brown 🐶

Way to go Charlie

Good luck Charlie-be a good boy as always ! Hugo is getting excited about meeting you next week-when you will be a STAR 🤩🤩🥳🥳

+ View more comments

3 hours ago

ADELAIDE BIPLANES

Shhhhhh!! it's a secret!

We have heard a whisper from Air Traffic Control that Father Christmas has sent in a flight plan to overfly Adelaide and Aldinga Airfield on his way to the South Pole at 1500 hours ( 3pm )on Sunday 23rd December 2018.

We have put together a cunning plan to dispatch Martyn the Pilot in the big Waco biplane to fly formation with Father Christmas and his reindeer, with the hope of bringing him back to the Airfield for a brief visit!

We have sent a text to The Elves and The CFS, requesting their assistance.

Santa's flight is subject to weather.
Enquiries to Adelaide Biplanes Flight Office:
08 8556 5404

All Welcome!
... See MoreSee Less

Shhhhhh!!  its a secret!

We have heard a whisper from Air Traffic Control that Father Christmas has sent in a flight plan to overfly Adelaide and Aldinga Airfield on his way to the South Pole at 1500 hours ( 3pm )on Sunday 23rd December 2018.

We have put together a cunning plan to dispatch Martyn the Pilot in the big Waco biplane to fly formation with Father Christmas and his reindeer, with the hope of bringing him back to the Airfield for a brief visit!

We have sent a text to The Elves and The CFS, requesting their assistance. 

Santas flight is subject to weather.
Enquiries to Adelaide Biplanes Flight Office: 
08 8556 5404

All Welcome!

 

Comment on Facebook

Melissa Slater

Steve Reid 🤔

Tina Filippidis

Robert Williamson Chloe Lumber 😉

Chris Clare

Tammy Kay Troy Woodland

Bianca Linsell Holly Freeland

Sheryn McElligott Eleanore Davis Jane Nicholson Satu Hoot Hoot Tahlia Jaine

Casey O'Daniel

Cooper Lamz

Alana Elgazzar Krystal Dukas may be something cool to take the kids to see

Travie Harris

Lisa Hill

+ View more comments

3 days ago

ADELAIDE BIPLANES

David Foxx writes, after a break of 12 years from flying

" 3, 2, 1, BREATHE ....

How long can you hold your breath?
30 seconds maybe?

For me, it was a little over 12 years.

By any definition, I’d become a rusty pilot – and the whole time felt like I was holding my breath. So when I finally got set-up to knock the rust off my license, I couldn’t wait to book myself in with Adelaide Biplanes at Aldinga.
Set in the beautiful McLaren Vale wine region, Aldinga Airfield has a shady, relaxed ease. As a bonus, Adelaide Biplanes offers a mouth-watering selection of cakes, comfortable chairs, walls covered in aviation memorabilia, and a long verandah that fronts the all-grass 14/32 runway.
They also operate a great range of aircraft. Alongside the usual flight school suspects, there’s a Waco YMF 5C and DH-82a Tiger Moth for Scenic Flights, a Great Lakes 2T1A-2 for aerobatic rides; plus a Super Decathlon, Super Cub and Sport Cub for tail wheel aviators.

AWOL FROM MY BRAIN

For all my enthusiasm, the first surprise was how gut-churningly nervous I was about that first-again flight. For weeks beforehand, I’d remember some crucial flying mnemonic and realise I’d completely forgotten it until that moment. What else was AWOL from my brain?
Clearly it wouldn’t be like riding a bike; it would be like flying for the very first time …again.
With a growing sense of trepidation, I practiced the phonetic alphabet on car number plates, then used the number plates to rehearse radio calls. Things I used to do the first time I was a newbie.
Eventually, there was nothing left to do but go. So I piled into the car with my galloping anxieties and reminded myself I was about to fly ........

MEET THE AIRCRAFT

At Adelaide Biplanes I met up with Chief Flying Instructor, Martyn Smith. To say Martyn knows his stuff would be an understatement. With almost 13,000 hours to his credit, before he even started Adelaide Biplanes, he has flown microlights, Super Cubs, Chipmunk, Jodels, then the Fokker F-27s, BAC -1-11s, MD-80s, B-737s, B-757s, B-767s – plus the fleet of sightseeing and training aircraft now under his supervision.
I’d elected to start out in his CubCrafters Sport Cub – a modern analogue of the classic Piper J-3 with a few modern concessions.
We talked about what I’d done and how long since I’d done it, the essentials of flight, and the Sport Cub’s characteristics. Having established that I hadn’t forgotten quite everything, we headed out to meet the aircraft.
I followed Martyn through the walkaround, learning where to sample the fuel and check the oil and that kind of thing. Then it was butt-first into the cockpit, threading myself over the sides and around the stick until my parts were all in their appropriate positions. We gathered up the four-point harness and I ran my eye over a relatively simple and surprisingly familiar panel.
Martyn called out the short, verbal pre-start checks and start-up procedure for me. As I twisted the key the propeller kicked once, spun into life, and settled into a happy twirling as I set the throttle.

KEEPING STRAIGHT

Taxiing a taildragger comes with its own set of challenges, and I’d be lying if I said it came back to me naturally.
Actually, I’d be lying if I said it came back to me at all. I meandered along the taxiways like a lost grandmother looking for an empty space in the church carpark. Slowly I meandered us around to runway 28 – a quite short-looking stretch of grass – and eventually got lined up to my satisfaction.
Then it was a relatively simple matter of feeding in throttle (while keeping straight), following the throttle with stick (while keeping straight), and putting in back pressure to get airborne (while still keeping straight).
In no time, the world was sinking away to where it belongs and we climbed out to 4,000 feet above the sparkling sea off Sellicks Beach.

STEEP TURNS AND STALLS

Now it was show time, starting with level turns, then steep turns. Rolling and banking, pulling through turns and the whole three-dimensional flow felt wonderful. I was flying again.
Which left not flying .... as in the whole gamut of stalls .... from low power level ones, through power-on stalls, stalls out of turns and side-slips, and stalls in a range of take-off and landing configurations.
Even though I knew better, I had an annoying habit of putting in aileron when recovering from the straight-ahead power on stalls. I started to get better after a few more, but I made a mental note to work on it more.
Martyn finished with a demonstration of the dreaded stall/spin from a skidding turn. (Often, fatally, a low-level finals turn.) He did one to the left and one to the right with me following on the controls.
This set-up delivers a vicious snap-roll and steep incipient spin. A windscreen full of Planet Earth is always pretty attention-grabbing, but I was very aware that I was getting completely left behind each time, too gob-smacked by the sudden flick-roll to move on to the spin recovery. Getting caught like that on finals would be nasty.

RUMBLE, RUMBLE, RUMBLE

With upper air work completed, we headed back to Aldinga Airfield for circuits.
As we joined overhead and confirmed that 28 was still into wind, I came up absolutely empty handed on how to descend on the dead side, cross mid-field and join downwind – let alone make a call announcing my intentions. I swallowed my pride and admitted I had no clue as to what to do next. With Martyn’s experienced guidance, we were soon in the right place.
I’ve always enjoyed flying circuits. In fact, landing is far and away my favourite thing to do in an airplane. There’s something satisfyingly precise and four-dimensional about returning an aircraft safely to the earth.
After the embarrassment of just getting into the circuit, the rest came back to me quite readily. As we slid down finals and the grass started to rush past, I lifted my eyes to the horizon and flared, gently increasing back pressure on the stick and – rumble, rumble, rumble.
Feed in power, forward on the stick, back into the circuit for another one. I couldn’t help but smile. I could still do this!

ENJOYING THE RIDE

We flew six circuits in all. On one landing, I ballooned a little, on another I felt a very definite swing from the tail, but arrested it and carried on.
As I looked to check my runway spacing during downwind number 5, out of the corner of my eye I saw Martyn sitting back in his seat, arms folded, enjoying the ride and that may have been the most satisfying, aviator-affirming moment of all.
As we parked up afterwards, I took a moment to enjoy the familiar music of a shutting-down aircraft. The lowering whine of gyros, ticking hot metal, and the loud quiet of not having the engine running.
Check one slightly less rusty pilot.
Once again, flying had made me feel taller, more accomplished, and full of a confidence I hadn’t enjoyed in years.

I was breathing again."

David Foxx is an advertising and aviation writer, as well as a volunteer member of both The Australian Vintage Aviation Society (TAVAS) and the South Australian Aviation Museum (SAAM). He publishes an aviation blog called ‘Airscape Magazine’ at airscapemag.com
... See MoreSee Less

 

Comment on Facebook

Awesome (and great writing!).

Great write up!

Marianne... Dig might find this interesting...

What a great story, I am sure that you also have a great big grin on your face as you ‘breath’ again 😆

Amazing writing- I was there with you!!!!!

David, well done. It’s like renewing the soul when you come back after a break. Welcome home pilot.

+ View more comments

1 week ago

ADELAIDE BIPLANES

Flynn Eickhoff .... First Solo in the tailwheel Sport Cub .... on his 15th birthday!

" I went flying with Andrew in a Lear Jet when I was 11 years old and I thought ... Wow, this is really cool!! I want to fly too!

At 13, we came down to Adelaide Biplanes just to find out the background to learning to fly. Jack was there and talked me through the process, then he said .... It's pretty quiet today, do you want to go now?"

That Trial Instructional Flight counted.

Riz sent me solo .... I wasn't as nervous as I thought I would be, then the realization hit me ... MY FIRST SOLO .... When I landed the adrenalin was still going. The best part about it was seeing my excitement in everyone else's faces!

Since solo I have continued and am now up to 23 hours. There will be lots more circuits, in varying conditions, learning to do wheelers ....

Exciting?? Definitely!!!!! ""
... See MoreSee Less

Flynn Eickhoff .... First Solo in the tailwheel Sport Cub .... on his 15th birthday!

 I went flying with Andrew in a Lear Jet when I was 11 years old and I thought ... Wow, this is really cool!! I want to fly too!

At 13, we came down to Adelaide Biplanes just to find out the background to learning to fly. Jack was there and talked me through the process, then he said .... Its pretty quiet today, do you want to go now?

That Trial Instructional Flight counted.

Riz sent me solo .... I wasnt as nervous as I thought I would be, then the realization hit me ... MY FIRST SOLO .... When I landed the adrenalin was still going. The best part about it was seeing my excitement in everyone elses faces!

Since solo I have continued and am now up to 23 hours. There will be lots more circuits, in varying conditions, learning to do wheelers ....

Exciting?? Definitely!!!!!

 

Comment on Facebook

I don't know you but I am proud of you young man . Well done .

Congratulayions🎈

Good work! Loving learning on taildraggers... 😊

Sensational. Well done, Flynn!

Congratulations, Flynn!

+ View more comments

1 week ago

ADELAIDE BIPLANES

David Yuen flies the biplanes ....

See you when you fly into Adelaide again

From all at ABP ....
... See MoreSee Less

 

Comment on Facebook

Richard Hasting is that your tiger moth?

David Yuen Jed. Thanks!

VIP David Yuen

David Yuen

Mmmmmmmm Tiger Moth goodness. 😍😍😍

+ View more comments

1 week ago

ADELAIDE BIPLANES

David Yuen flies in the biplanes before flying back to Hong Kong ....

David, 28 years old, has a degree in Mechanical Engineering and became a System Engineer working in Air Conditioning in Hong Kong.

"But I've always wanted to fly! I worked in a team to do the maintenance of the central air conditioning units in Hong Kong International Airport.

I have just achieved my Commercial Pilot Licence, but my actual First Solo was in the tailwheel Sport Cub, 12 months ago. Since then I have continued to add to my tailwheel flying and have enjoyed flying solo in the 1946 Aeronca Champ.

Today I flew the 1940 Tiger Moth and the 1942 Boeing Stearman. It was my first time taking the controls and flying in an open cockpit biplane, with Martyn of course!

I appreciate the beauty of the biplanes. They have a different personality! It was very exciting, absolutely amazing and you can really feel that you are flying like a bird!"
... See MoreSee Less

 

Comment on Facebook

Luke Sutherland

😍

Julie Burge

Awesome 😆

Congratulations David.

Rebecca Basson Jacob Daniel Basson

+ View more comments

LOAD MORE